have been super busy lately so in lieu of that, here’s a mini update on a project I’ve been shooting recently

Rad poster invite for Henry Swanzy's next show! More new stuff on its way soon.

New work up on my website - Liskeard town regeneration campaign, shot over two days with my friends Jon and Bex, and the good people of Liskeard. To view the full set please click the above link! 

new home page

nice to give the site a spruce up occasionally

result of the storm

view from flushing on a grey day

A little preview of something in the pipeline: 

More pictures here.

A few weeks ago I shot an assignment for Una St Ives, a brand new holiday village on the north Cornwall coast. The homes, although still under construction, are extremely beautiful and designed to create a minimal carbon footprint. When they’re unoccupied, Una rents them to other holiday makers, thus earning money for the home owner. A pretty solid investment if you ask me. The shoot itself took approx 3 weeks of preparation, two 13 hour days on set, and 4 days in post production. The weekend of the shoot itself, there were 60 mph winds and rain that made loading things in and out a tad tricky, shall we say. Here are my favourites from the shoot:

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Styling: Anya Rice

Art Direction: Nixon Design

Interiors: Willow & Stone, Cream Cornwall, Iroka

Florist: Amanda Taffinder

Catering: St. Ives Food Company, The Cornish Deli

Artwork: The New Craftsman Gallery

To see more from the shoot, please visit my website

some (rare) black and white snaps that have been waiting to be developed since last year:

got this sweet 60’s melamine office desk to do non pixel-based stuff on

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we found this amazing forest clinging to the side of the cliffs today. a pretty unexpected discovery after nearly turning back, faced with stinging rain and wearing expressions akin to a bulldog chewing a nettle. everyone moans about wet weather, but the light it produces when the sun does make an appearance is epic. as i write this, a complete, double rainbow is straddling the harbour. 

it is tricky to reproduce this kind of light correctly using a digital camera, the changing contrast and subtle colours just don’t stick straight out of the file. this is something i worry about, along with every other photo nerd who loved film. it’s kind of sad to talk about it in the past tense, but as great as it is, paying jobs that involve using film these days are as likely as bieber being inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame. i had an assignment 18 months ago where the choice between film and digital was offered to me, but unless i could get the negs developed on the plane ride home, there was no way the deadline would allow. question is, are digital photographers better off than film users? what do you do if your style is based entirely on the use of film, but you don’t know how to properly process a raw file? you’re up shit creek without a pixel.  

there are programs out there that are meant to replicate the look of film, but your photos will end up looking like everyone else’s, and i’m pretty sure these filters will look dated in time to come. just like an upmarket instagram maybe. i think if you study the way film reproduces in different situations, it is possible to recreate some of that integrity. or at least produce something better than those weirdly lifeless pictures that pop up on our screens. 

i still get the same buzz opening a bunch of files as opposed to watching a print develop, only you can rest easy knowing you’re not being toxically fumigated, or stared at by the creepy darkroom bloke. there’s always one.